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jmcglos's picture
Joined: Nov 29 2004
Posts: 212
Taking glue off wheels

Ok, so I'm in the process of re-gluing my tires onto my Zipps (yes, just 11 days before IMFL - I'm good at doing things last minute and then panicking.....). How important is it for me to take off all the glue that's already on the wheel from taking off the old tire? Do I need to get it completely off before gluing on the new tire or can there be some glue still on the wheel?

Thanks for your input!

kicker's picture
Joined: Jul 1 2005
Posts: 53

I would definitely take the old glue off. I had the same problem last year, and I used goo-gone gel to get the glue off. It won't hurt the epoxy of the carbon, but don't scrub it. Use a tongue depressor to peel it off once the gel has set on the old glue for a few minutes. Then rinse to get everything off. Let them dry, and start re-gluing.

Not sure if you've ever used it, but if you haven't, try the tufo rim tape. I've been really happy with it, and haven't come close to rolling a tire. Not just that, but it's much quicker to put on. Both tires took me about an hour.

Anton's picture
Joined: Mar 4 2005
Posts: 5352

First look at the wheels..if there isn't much glue on the rim...don't worry about it. If you have tons of glue you used too much the last time. Most IM's, with a few exceptions don't require the bombproof glue job that road racing does...Goo-gone does work well...as to the tape..use it and try it in training...11 days out from your IM, Go with what you know.
Remember...Pre streatch the tire....a thin coat on the rim and tire. Second coat the rim after drying..let it go tacky then place the tire...spin to check for true after putting in just enough air to round out the tire. Make sure you have a thin dry coat of glue on the spares.
Best of luck at IMFL!

jmcglos's picture
Joined: Nov 29 2004
Posts: 212

Thanks for the all the advice. I bought some goo gone at lunch and it's been much easier to get it all off.

spazz's picture
Joined: Apr 26 2007
Posts: 53

so race wheels like zipps you have to glue the tires? why? and how do you change them when you get a flat in a race?

jmcglos's picture
Joined: Nov 29 2004
Posts: 212

[QUOTE=spazz;83482]so race wheels like zipps you have to glue the tires? why? and how do you change them when you get a flat in a race?[/QUOTE]

It depends on if you get clincher wheels or tubulars - Zipp makes both. The tubulars are the ones you have to glue on and you mount the tire onto the rim - no tubes to mess with. If you flat in a race, you'll switch out the entire tire, not a tube like with the clinchers. You prep the spare tire with glue on it days before the race, so that it will stick to the wheel when you switch it out. I'm hoping for no flats on race day b/c the entire process, in my opinion, is not fun!

Tikal Dog's picture
Joined: Feb 4 2005
Posts: 1028

i'm too lazy for tubulars!!! If i had to change I tubular tire i would probably just drop off the race. (well...maybe not but I don't like the idea)

MarkyV's picture
Joined: Aug 10 2007
Posts: 103

[QUOTE=jmcglos;83311]Ok, so I'm in the process of re-gluing my tires onto my Zipps (yes, just 11 days before IMFL - I'm good at doing things last minute and then panicking.....). How important is it for me to take off all the glue that's already on the wheel from taking off the old tire? Do I need to get it completely off before gluing on the new tire or can there be some glue still on the wheel?

Thanks for your input![/QUOTE]

Be careful with the goo-b-gone. If there is a crack within the clear coat of the wheel then the acid nature of the stuff will attack the carbon fibre. Same reason you don't want to be washing a carbon fibre bike with citrus degreaser.

Best tool that i have used from bike shops to talking to zipp guys... finger nail and a nickel. You'll be suprised how well the nickel sits right in the tray nicely.

Best of luck at IMFL! Hope that this did not come too late.

Sandman's picture
Joined: Mar 28 2007
Posts: 127

[QUOTE=MarkyV;83712]Be careful with the goo-b-gone. If there is a crack within the clear coat of the wheel then the acid nature of the stuff will attack the carbon fibre. Same reason you don't want to be washing a carbon fibre bike with citrus degreaser.

Best tool that i have used from bike shops to talking to zipp guys... finger nail and a nickel. You'll be suprised how well the nickel sits right in the tray nicely.

Best of luck at IMFL! Hope that this did not come too late.[/QUOTE]

Citrus degreaser....Is that why my Orbea has spots that look like the carbon is roughened up? Never knew that.

MarkyV's picture
Joined: Aug 10 2007
Posts: 103

[QUOTE=Sandman;83764]Citrus degreaser....Is that why my Orbea has spots that look like the carbon is roughened up? Never knew that.[/QUOTE]

Bingo!

Are you stalking me? :) I'm telling Dana!!! :)

jmcglos's picture
Joined: Nov 29 2004
Posts: 212

Thanks for the advice. I didn't know that about the citrus degreaser too - good to know.

spazz's picture
Joined: Apr 26 2007
Posts: 53

whats the advantage of having tubulars, is there a major advantage to race wheels in general? if i'm doing olympics at 22, halfs at 21, and ironman at hopefully 20, is there going to be any help? right now i just got the piece of sht stock wheels that come with the cervelo dual

UFTriGator's picture
Joined: Mar 22 2006
Posts: 1249

You'll probably see about 1 mph difference with some deep aero wheels. Definitely worth getting.

Tubulars are generally supposed to have a better ride quality than clinchers, but modern clincher technology has gotten so good that the difference is getting smaller and smaller. I'll still never race on clinchers, though, since the difference is still there. Tubulars are also significantly lighter.

Sully800's picture
Joined: Sep 19 2007
Posts: 446

[QUOTE=UFTriGator;84289]You'll probably see about 1 mph difference with some deep aero wheels. Definitely worth getting.

Tubulars are generally supposed to have a better ride quality than clinchers, but modern clincher technology has gotten so good that the difference is getting smaller and smaller. I'll still never race on clinchers, though, since the difference is still there. [B]Tubulars are also significantly lighter.[/B][/QUOTE]

And since the tire is the furthest from the center of any rotating piece, decreasing its weight will have a bigger impact than decreasing weight on any other part of the bike.

That being said, I don't have tubulars and I'm not sure when I will view the hassle as being worth while. I guess if I get a set of race wheels I would get tubulars, and keep clinchers on my road wheels for convenience.

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