tubular tire repair

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This topic contains 16 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of robmathews66 robmathews66 2 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #13039
    Avatar of jbinkc
    jbinkc
    Participant

    what do you all use if you get a flat on the road with a tubular? do you carry a spare tire and change it? has any one used vittoria pit stop? any other quick fix products that will get me home? thanks for the advice

    #125695
    Avatar of spomeroy
    spomeroy
    Participant

    Yep. Spare tubie and a strip of Tufo Tubular Tape. Although the couple of times Ive used tubies I havent had to change. Some people use Pitstop but keep in mind I understand that if you have valve extensions its very likely the Pitstop wont get in the tire itself. Also, make extra certain that about 48hrs (at least) before you need to pack it up on the bike you pump the tubie up with air (say to 110 or so PSI and let it stretch before completely airing it out, folding up and strapping it onto your bike. At least this is what I do..

    cheers
    S.

    #125696
    Avatar of NotAsFast
    NotAsFast
    Participant

    Just out of interest, if you do have a puncture in a tubular, how do you repair the puncture after you get back to base ? Been wondering about that one. Seems pointless to throw a $80 tubular away.

    #125701
    Avatar of TriSooner
    TriSooner
    Participant
    jbinkc wrote:
    what do you all use if you get a flat on the road with a tubular?

    I remember years ago when “Style Guy” in Bicycling Magazine was over-the-top snobby and snarky, his advice was that the only necessity for on-road repair was an AmEx Black and iPhone. He has since now softened his tone :(

    NotAsFast wrote:
    how do you repair the puncture after you get back to base

    Tubulars are also called ‘sew-ups’ and the to get to the tube, you have to un-sew tire
    [img=250X200]http://www.yellowjersey.org/TUBFIX3.JPG[/img]

    Fix the tube and put it back into the tire . . .
    [img=250X200]http://www.yellowjersey.org/TUBFIX7.JPG[/img]

    And then sew it back up.
    [img=250X200]http://www.yellowjersey.org/TUBFIX9.JPG[/img]

    Do this while sipping a Tuscan Chianti, listening to the soothing sounds of Giuseppe Verdi, under the watchful eye of a Fausto Coppi poster, and you’ll feel ready for the Giro.

    #125703
    Avatar of xc800runner
    xc800runner
    Participant

    Or just use Tufo Sealant/Vittoria Pit Stop. Is it perfect? No. But it’s a lot easier than stripping off the tire, un-sewing, patching, resewing, applying another layer of glue, reseating the tire, inflating and waiting 2 more days before the glue has set and you’re able to corner at faster than 2 mph again.

    #125713
    Avatar of TriSooner
    TriSooner
    Participant
    xc800runner wrote:
    Or just use Tufo Sealant/Vittoria Pit Stop . . .

    People who ride on tubulars (at least some) like the nostalgic ol’ school cache that comes with the laborious process of repairing sew-ups. These are the same riders that recoil at the thought of electric shifters (and might actually prefer down tube shifters and pre-indexed gears). By the new nature of the sport, most (?) triathletes aren’t interested in cycling tradition and the idea of switching tubular tires during a race forces them into the easy-to-change clincher option. If you are riding tubulars and want an easy way to fix the tubular flat, then you are riding the wrong tire.

    #125723
    Avatar of xc800runner
    xc800runner
    Participant
    TriSooner wrote:
    xc800runner wrote:
    Or just use Tufo Sealant/Vittoria Pit Stop . . .

    People who ride on tubulars (at least some) like the nostalgic ol’ school cache that comes with the laborious process of repairing sew-ups. These are the same riders that recoil at the thought of electric shifters (and might actually prefer down tube shifters and pre-indexed gears). By the new nature of the sport, most (?) triathletes aren’t interested in cycling tradition and the idea of switching tubular tires during a race forces them into the easy-to-change clincher option. If you are riding tubulars and want an easy way to fix the tubular flat, then you are riding the wrong tire.

    I’m with you, but for the multitude of riders out there, it’s either a quick fix like sealant or toss out the flat and slap on a new tire with tape. For me? It’s a DNF (hasn’t yet happened, knock on wood) and 3 days of inhaling fumes.

    #125729
    Avatar of Anton
    Anton
    Participant

    I love this thread! I carry a spare tire strapped under the seat with an old cage strap. As to fixing them…I take ‘em apart and fix the tube and sew them back up a’la Sooners post above. (I prefer Velox, Fil de Lin)
    Yes it’s a pain, but my oh my…it’s a connection to the way things used to be in the dark ages (1970′s and earlier) Getting the cloth tape to re-seat well can be problematic though. If the repaired tire punctures a second time, then I recycle it.
    During a race, if it happens, the tire is garbage since I cut the tube off with a light weight box cutter.
    I tried Tufo sealant as a preventative measure and wasn’t impressed when I finally did puncture.
    Wait two days for the glue to cure so you can ride…nonsense. 24 hours max. And I wouldn’t train on my sew-ups anyway…too costly. Even in a race with a pre glued spare you do just fine without letting it set…just watch the turns and the fast descents.
    And yes…I love down tube shifters and think a hand made steel bike is a wonder. If you’ve never ridden a good steel bike (Ciocc, Masi, Casati, Massimo. Notice they’re all Italian) you have no idea what I mean…

    #125751
    Avatar of thesonicson
    thesonicson
    Participant

    Well me being the sort-of newbie that I am, just purchased some 85mm carbon tubular wheels (for races) and can’t wait to give them a spin. From what I read, well made tubulars are sworn upon by those who race them. And practically those who talk against them are the new-age primadonna’s who worry more about changing a tire then riding a tire. My opinion is if you flat during a race it doesn’t matter what kind of tire you have cause you just lost regardless. Anton can correct me on this if I’m wrong, but don’t you have better odds that you’ll flat on a clincher before a tubular?

    #125757
    Avatar of Anton
    Anton
    Participant

    I think there is more that can go wrong with a clincher. However, if you do it right you can reduce problems. Ride good tires, not the cheap stuff. Use a good cloth rim tape. Dust the inside of the tires with baby powder…it acts as a lubricant between tire and tube to reduce friction. Check the tire often. Learn to wipe glass off with a gloved hand. With presta valves you can put in a puff of air by mouth to get the tube easier to work with. That way it won’t get caught between the rim and outside of the tire. Don’t over inflate…don’t pump a tube 110 lb. tube to 110 lbs on a 90 degree day. Warm air expands. When you change the tube out, check the inside of the tire for stuff that’s poked through.
    Still though I think clinchers are more prone to pinch flats and spoke pokes and other things than sew-ups. But that’s opinion based on 30 years of riding…not science.
    Sew ups still, in my opinion, give the best ride….but at a cost.

    #162386
    Avatar of StephenPDennis
    StephenPDennis
    Participant

    Don’t mind me, just doing some research on a possible christmas present for myself…..

    So presuming I decided to go out and pick up some H-3 tubulars to compliment the shimano POS-500′s that came on my ride. I think I’d only use the H-3s as race wheels and in race-practice scenarios. What about my cassette? Is it reasonable that I would be able to learn how to remove it from my training wheel onto the H-3 hub or is that really something a LBS should do? I wouldn’t want to go all the way to my LBS each time I change wheels (I don’t care for my actual LBS’s so I have to ride about 45 minutes into another part of brooklyn)

    After reading this I am very attracted to the idea of being ‘closer’ to my bike and becoming a better and more conscious rider that might come with stitching. Or maybe it was the promise of chianti. Eitherway I’m sold.

    #162409
    Avatar of snail_male
    snail_male
    Participant

    Stephen,

    I took the plunge last year that you’re considering, and I’m quite happy I did (used H3Cs). Definitely, if you are at all handy don’t bother having the LBS swap out your cassette. In fact, I made my own chain whip from a scrap length of chain and small steel pipe I flattened at one end. Drilled a hole in it and passed a small bolt through it and the chain et voila!

    All you should need then is the funky socket & wrench for the low profile ring nut holding your cassette. Once you’ve unscrewed that, just be careful sliding the sprockets and spacers on and off the wheels’ hubs, mindful of their order of assembly, and you should be golden. Even with taking time to wipe down the sprockets (good time to sip on the Chianti, no?) you could be wrapping up in 10 minutes.

    #169791
    Avatar of inchirieri
    inchirieri
    Participant

    i always carry a spare tire with me; learned my lessons after a couple of times, as the roads in my country are what they are. I tried to use pitstop several times but it wasn’t one hundred percent, keeping in mind spomeroy’s post earlier.

    #175992
    Avatar of TonyFla1
    TonyFla1
    Participant

    As for repairing, there’s a guy in Fla that repairs them for $23…. does great work!

    http://www.tirealert.com

    #176010
    Avatar of Great Greyhound
    Great Greyhound
    Participant

    I love the H3C’s, and I too carry a spare tire. I broke down and bought another cassette, that way I don’t have to move the cassette back and forth.

    That said, swapping the cassette gives you a chance to clean it, and have a good Ale at the same time!

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