My food challenge

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This topic contains 13 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of bradaellis bradaellis 3 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #17170
    Avatar of panda
    panda
    Participant

    I love training toward my triathlon goals, I am definetly a MOP with a goal not to finish to close to the bottom of the pack. I can say I’m very disciplined in my training and follow my plan very well. One of my primary goals with triathlons is to loose weight, then stay at a healthy weight. Triathlons are an awesome way to reach that goal.

    The hardest thing for me to do is maintain a healthy diet. I doubt it applies to a lot of people here because we are all such finely tuned specimens :) , but sometimes for me passing up an extra plate, or a quick lunch trip out with co-workers to a not so healhty place seems as hard as running a 10k (or think whatever distance is hard for you). I know that your body will crave more when you work out, but its the choice of foods that is the battle for me.

    I find it interesting how my will power can be so good with training, and so bad with food. I’m just throwing my thoughts out there.

    #169230
    Avatar of JLEX
    JLEX
    Participant

    I find the more I train the better my diet becomes, if I’m training hard it feels like I’m doing myself a disservice by eating junk and I tend to eat as well as possible the more I do. Maybe if you nail all the training you’ll be less inclined to eat the junk. Though that said everyone deserves a food break once in a while!

    #169232
    Avatar of paganopj
    paganopj
    Participant

    Interesting. I eat more crap when I am not training….probably because I’m not training when I have a lot of external stress and that gravitates me to the crap! When I get focused, I am able to eat better because I want the most from my training. I also keep a food log in Excel to keep me honest. That’s how I lost 100lbs.

    #169234
    Avatar of big 3
    big 3
    Participant
    panda wrote:
    I know that your body will crave more when you work out, but its the choice of foods that is the battle for me.

    I find it interesting how my will power can be so good with training, and so bad with food. I’m just throwing my thoughts out there.

    You are on the right track with your thinking. The choice of foods is the battle. Your workouts will allow you to lose some weight when you first change your lifestyle to be more active. There is a limit to how much you can workout tho’, and as you said, working out will cause you to eat more.
    I’ve dropped 50-60 pounds from when I first started a few years ago. (currently 50, need to get back to 60). I can tell you that one of the best things I did was track my food on fitday.com. By doing that, I was able to go down the list and see the high calorie density foods that really were my downfall. Making big cuts in a few big ticket foods, while adding some volumetric foods (oatmeal, salads, vegetables) and then watching the weight fall off as a result, really drove home the importance of eating well.
    I get the mental battle as well. I think to start, you just have to want the weight loss more than the Pizza. There is no easy way around that to start. Eventually that battle becomes much easier. I don’t have any trouble watching people eat the foods I used to love because I know what those things do to me. I may be jealous of the fact that those people may have a metabolism that I just don’t have, but what can you do?
    I’m not sure how much you have to lose but I can tell you from experience when I started this, I never would have imagined that I would ever swim, bike or run as fast as I do now. Lose the weight and set a bunch of PRs!
    Good Luck

    #169239
    Avatar of panda
    panda
    Participant

    Thanks for the encouragement. Losing 50 is my goal right now. The good news is my wife is on board with this and right now we are in the process of purging the house of all the bad stuff. I think I will start a log, why not I already keep one for the workouts. I will check out fitday. I just have to approach this the same way as I do with the training. I know my weaknesses, and then work to address them.

    100lbs lost is awesome paganopj, 50-60 is just as amazing big3. I hope to be able to tell the same story (sooner rather than later.)

    #169241

    Hey I am in the same boat as you when it comes to weight management. I started running to loose weight and just happen to fall in love with tri’s. I find that when I get up in the morning to train I have more control over my entire day of food. My suggestion is to eat lots just what I call low cal; high density foods. So I eat lots of fruit, veggies, cottage cheese and yogurt. I also never let myself get hungry so I have a cliff bar in my bag at all times. I also have had a food journal for about a year and cant live without it. I am down 45 and have about 20 to go. I am very strict with my training which allow me to have some treats once in a while as nurt is all about moderation. Keep it up, you can get there!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    #169247
    Avatar of vjohnson
    vjohnson
    Participant

    It is always a struggle, sometimes I just find the car pulling into a drive thru. For me, its a reward thing, I busted my butt, so I’m entitled to a cheeseburger, which is O.K., but I reward myself too much,and too frequently sometimes.
    It is healthy to cheat, we need to keep our sanity, but we can be smart about when we cheat. If you are going to cheat, try to do so in the post workout window (the amount of time after your workout, based on the length of the workout), I’m not saying do it, but if you are this is a good time.
    Another option is hitting up a big meal before a long training weekend. Remind yourself of the free speed that goes along with weight. 1lb=2-3sec/mile on the run, so if you just lost 20pds, that is a minute/mile faster then you are right now.

    #169248
    Avatar of gfd
    gfd
    Participant

    Bummer, I thought this was going to have something to do with eating 12 wings with ghost chilis or how many burritos can you eat in 30 minutes.

    To the OP, I usually eat well 6 days out of the week. But you have to live a little. I think most of us would like to be a few pounds lighter to be faster, but most of us are not in contention to win any races or have our pro cards. I keep at a healthy weight and as the season begins I pay a bit more attention to my weight.

    Oh, and wait until PoC sees all those “looses” ;-)

    #169255
    Avatar of BigRunswim
    BigRunswim
    Participant

    I always think to myself what the heck am i training for if I am just going to throw it all away on a crappy meal anyways. I dont think of food as tasting good but instead I think of it as fuel. It is just fuel to train with, thats all. I mean your body knows better than alot of people will let it think it does.

    I also have struggled with eating right so I have decided to go vegan. I mean that way I really cant eat crap.

    Just another thought

    Good luck.

    #169262
    Avatar of jenez_world
    jenez_world
    Participant

    the thing with food is that it has to become your lifestyle and a reason i dislike the word diet is that it implies there is a beginning and an end and there isnt. it is a permanent lifestyle. having said that the biggest tip is moderation. you dont have to give up anything. you just have to be real and only have it in moderation. i think if you try and deny yourself of everything you are more than likely to fail. as far as junk food goes if i feel the need to pig out then i try and pick the better options and minimise the damage.

    #169277
    Avatar of hamlet_cat
    hamlet_cat
    Participant

    This is an interesting post, I really liked reading everyone’s opinions and experiences on this topic. I have struggled with my weight ever since I was 16 so I have been battling the food/diet issues forever. I pretty much tried every diet out there, nothing worked to keep off the weight long term. I even took up smoking in my 20s to keep my weight down and yes, that worked but there are consequences to that, as everyone knows. In my late 20s I took up jogging, as an excuse to quit smoking, and funny, you would think that that would work. It didn’t. Even running 40K a week didn’t seem to matter, as I found myself, just stuffing my face to replace the calories I burned constantly doing a lot of LSD running. I would like to say that I just have a “bad metabolism” and could at least have an answer as to why it is so difficult. But I am not convinced about the metabolism argument. I am now 40, and weigh about 125lbs. Which is a reasonable weight for someone my age and height, but according to triathlon standards I am probably still about 5 lbs overweight. What I will tell you is this, and this is really depressing (sorry). But the truth is that if you want to be physically fit and a good healthy weight, you probably won’t be able to eat the way that you have been used to eating over the last few years. You may indulge but it will probably only be a couple of days a year. (ie. Christmas, thanksgiving, easter.) I work out about 15 hours a week and still can’t eat whatever I want. I do go out to dinner with friends and I order a meal salad with a protein, oil and vinegar dressing, and a glass of water and that is my meal. Yes, I do watch them eat fries, pizza, chicken wings, beer…….but I also know how much time it takes to “work off” a meal like that, and that food has little to no nutritional value. One of the sad truths about “junk food” is the more you eat it, the more you want it. It is because meals high in calories but low in nutritional value just keep you hungry and coming back for more and more. The fast food industry relies on this premise to make money. The one thing that I can tell you is that it does get easier. The first time you have a salad for dinner, you think, how will I ever survive on this meal? Your body does eventually adapt, and your will start craving healthy food instead. I have actually gotten to the point that when I eat fast food I actually feel sick. I don’t crave it at all anymore, and now if I am on the road and that is the only option, I will stop at a gas station and eat a package of cashews instead of going for a hamburger and fries. What worked for me in the end over many years of trial and error, was choosing healthy foods and cutting out anything that provided “calories” but no nutrition. Also watching how many high GI foods I was eating. For example a plain bagel sounds reasonably healthy, but it can spike your blood sugar level and make you hungry a couple of hours later. A bowl of oatmeal would be a better choice. And also exercise, but I personally don’t find moderate exercise to be helpful unless you are more than 30lbs overweight. Triathlon training puts me beyond what is considered to be moderate exercise, and through this combination of diet and exercise (complete lifestyle change) I can maintain a healthy weight. At first it is hard work, but it becomes easier over time and eventually you will get to the point where you have lots of energy and you feel very healthy, and it feels like it takes no work at all. I hope that helps. Good luck with your goals!

    #169296
    Avatar of paganopj
    paganopj
    Participant
    panda wrote:
    I love training toward my triathlon goals, I am definetly a MOP with a goal not to finish to close to the bottom of the pack. I can say I’m very disciplined in my training and follow my plan very well. One of my primary goals with triathlons is to loose weight, then stay at a healthy weight. Triathlons are an awesome way to reach that goal.

    The hardest thing for me to do is maintain a healthy diet. I doubt it applies to a lot of people here because we are all such finely tuned specimens :) , but sometimes for me passing up an extra plate, or a quick lunch trip out with co-workers to a not so healthy place seems as hard as running a 10k (or think whatever distance is hard for you). I know that your body will crave more when you work out, but its the choice of foods that is the battle for me.

    I find it interesting how my will power can be so good with training, and so bad with food. I’m just throwing my thoughts out there.

    If you are not including weight training in your workout routine, adding this could also help with weight loss and maintaining a fit appearance. More muscle burns fat and helps avoid the ‘skinny fat’ trap that many deal with who do nothing but cardio.

    #169304
    Avatar of dkhartung
    dkhartung
    Participant

    I totally get the OP and the issue/challenge. One of the things I’ve found helpful is to go ahead and cheat a bit, but not go too far.
    Out with work buddies for lunch at a pizza joint? Rather than the slice of all meat deep dish, I’ll go for a slice of thin crust veggie pizza and a side salad, and eat the side salad first.
    Dinner with the family and wanting that second plate? I’ll look at my watch and tell myself that I’m going to take five minutes to just talk to the kids while giving myself permission to grab that second plate if, after five minutes, I’m still hungry. There’s something about giving myself the permission and waiting that results in me not getting that second plate… most of the time.
    There’s a great burger joint on my way home from my long ride spot and there’s something magnetic there that just pulls my car right off the road. Rather than the double cheeseburger, I’ll grab the cheeseburger with bison meat.
    I think you just have to find those little tricks to play on yourself that allow you to live a little, without doing too many things to sabotage all your hard effort.

    #170141
    Avatar of bradaellis
    bradaellis
    Participant

    Just remember, food is fuel. Put junk in the tank and the performance becomes subpar. Put high octane, good food in, get better performance. Don’t throw all that hard work down the tubes because your co-worker needs a co-pilot to the local fast food joint.

    That being said, try scheduling your “treat” for the week like you would your other workouts. It gives you something to look forward to and it’s much easier to control.

    Good Luck!
    Brad

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