Biking vs. Running heart rate

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Home Triathlon Forum Triathlon Discussions Biking vs. Running heart rate

This topic contains 19 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of mindanalyzer mindanalyzer 4 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)
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  • #12243
    Profile photo of nanhosen
    nanhosen
    Participant

    I’ve noticed an interesting phenomenon. When I’m running, my heart rate is around 150 if I’m doing a decent pace, and 165-170 if I’m really pushing it. However, when I’m biking, my heart rate is much lower, yet I feel like I’m working just as hard, if not harder! I did a long canyon near my house (15 miles, 3000 vert feet) and my max HR was around 150.
    Any ideas what this means?

    #116453
    Profile photo of brittda
    brittda
    Participant

    Totally normal. Polar has some training info on their site about this. You will run approx 5% higher than biking. Swimming was about 5% less than biking. Everyone is a little different so this is an estimate.

    #116457
    Profile photo of jhudalla
    jhudalla
    Participant

    Think of it this way, when you are running you are supporting your body weight with your legs and pumping your arms VS. when you are riding your weight is supported mainly by your seat and your legs (should) be the only part of your body expending energy.

    Same thing happens to me. 160-170 no problem on the run, 160 on the bike is really working hard and 170 is a recipe for a bonk.

    #116459
    Profile photo of RunMDC
    RunMDC
    Participant

    You can even experiment with this in the gym. Do step ups on a platform with your hands at your side. Then do them but as you step up raise your arms above your head. using your arms raises your heart rate significantly. Same goes for running, more muscle groups involved.

    #116462
    Profile photo of xc800runner
    xc800runner
    Participant

    Ride harder?

    No, seriously, your body works harder for a given percieved effort on the run that it will on the bike. Like the rest said, it has to do with additional muscles doing work. I hit spin class once a week and my highest heart rate always comes when doing push-ups while riding a cadence around 100. Spiked to 208 last week.

    #116464
    Profile photo of jhudalla
    jhudalla
    Participant

    208?! Jebus, that’s stroke range! xc800runner, do you do spin class all year round?

    #116465
    Profile photo of xc800runner
    xc800runner
    Participant

    I’ll hit it up once a week to maintain my anaerobic strength. The highest I’ve ever gotten my HR was 232, running 400m repeats up a mountain in Oregon (about 9 years ago, when I was 16 and a pretty decent 800m runner). My current max is about 220, and I haven’t stroked yet.

    #116467
    Profile photo of jhudalla
    jhudalla
    Participant

    Dayng. I can push it to 185 but at that rate I feel like my head is going to egg-splode! Guess I need to whip it up more often.

    #116470
    Profile photo of Tamara
    Tamara
    Participant

    I’m reading the USAT Coaches manual now and it states that the average bike HR is about 5-10 beats per minute below the comparable run heart rate. If you are testing lactate threshold in one sport, for example, use a 7 beat difference for the other until you’ve done more work and can dial it in even better.

    #116475
    Profile photo of csaf31
    csaf31
    Participant

    I have a similar issue. I want to keep my bike HR in the 141-153 range when I ride and on a 40-50 mile ride can do this for maybe an hour and 15 minutes. I usually try a bigger gear to get my HR up on the bike but then my muscles are toast and I end up riding slower and slacking off at the end. However, when its warmer I can get my bike HR up in that range easier. Getting HR into that range when I run is no problem.

    #116477
    Profile photo of deepbluex
    deepbluex
    Participant

    Does this mean you should not swing your arms too much when running because swinging them makes your HR go up?

    #116480
    Profile photo of jsk85
    jsk85
    Participant
    deepbluex wrote:
    Does this mean you should not swing your arms too much when running because swinging them makes your HR go up?

    No, armswing should be a natural motion caused by the momentum of your running. Having to focus energy to keep your arms still while maintaining the same running form and speed will exert your muscles much more and raise your HR.

    #116484
    Profile photo of xc800runner
    xc800runner
    Participant

    I’m starting to think I’m a bit unhealthy here. People having trouble averaging 160 on the bike, bonking at 175… My ride yesterday was 65 mi in 3:20, averaged 267 Watts and 164 HR (about 15 bpm below AeT), with an hour sustained at 170-173 bpm. Nice, steady zone 3 training from power/hr profiles. Resting HR 51 this morning. I wish I could actually keep my heart rate down. 145-150 bpm is just coasting, and at the bottom of my zone 2.

    Is there any advantage to having a hyperactive HR?

    #116487
    Profile photo of jhudalla
    jhudalla
    Participant

    my resting hr is 58… 3 plus hours averaging 165 would probly leave me pretty wasted though. Maybe your stroke volume is low or something. But, I’m a software guy, what the hell do I know about physiology?!

    #116493
    Profile photo of jnrice
    jnrice
    Participant

    yeah, I run the opposite. My heart rate is way higher on the bike than the run. I’m comfortable sitting 160-170 for an hour on the bike but would die if I tried that running. hmmm…

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