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swibiru's picture
Joined: Dec 29 2007
Posts: 9
pelvic misalignment

Upon visting a pyhsical therapist recently due to a injury that would'nt seem to go away I learned that I have plevic misalignment. I was told this is going to be difficult to fix and there is no surgey that can be done if all else fails. Does anyone have any expierence or know anything more about this. If this has happened to you or you know some one who has had this problem please respond. I would be greatful for any information you can provide me.

Anton's picture
Joined: Mar 4 2005
Posts: 5350
How is it misaligned? One

How is it misaligned? One side higher than the other? Fore or aft?
A lot of us here have a leg length discrepancy which results in one side being higher and causes problems...a little more info and maybe we can help sort this out...

swibiru's picture
Joined: Dec 29 2007
Posts: 9
The right side was higher

The right side was higher than the left resulting in an apparent leg length dicrepancy. The pyhsical therapist I saw did a simple procedure that aligned my pelvis properly, although he said it will probaly slip back to where it was very easly. He gave me two excersises to do throughout the day to help align my pelvis. These excersises involve laying down in the sit up postion putting a belt aroudn my knees keeping my feet together and trying vigoursly to spread my knees and in the same position without the belt squezing a ball(in my case a helmet) between my legs vigoursly. I will see him again on Wed and if all is well my pelvis will still be aligned. If not I gues I'll keep trying. I really appreciate the concern hope to read back soon. Also he said that I should go one month with my pelvis in proper alignment before I began to do an running, cycling, or vigorous swimming.

jgJones's picture
Joined: Jan 2 2008
Posts: 1
I've been reading trifuel

I've been reading trifuel for a few years, but never registered to post before. When i read your post I knew I had to write in since I've been dealing with something similar for the last 3 years. To make a long story short, I first experienced pain in my hip while training for a marathon in 2005. I trained through it (probably my first mistake) and did the marathon. When I started running again after the marathon the pain got worse and I finally had it checked out. A regular MRI didn't show anything, but an arthro-MRI showed that I had a torn superior labrum (ie torn cartilage on the edge of the hip socket, and which from my online reading says that torn labrums can often be missed in MRIs and even arthro-MRIs (although I'm no doc)). So I had hip arthroscopy surgery to fix the tear, which they succesfully did. That was the summer of 2006. After following the correct rehab, I was terribly disappointed since I still had hip pain. I gave my hip complete rest for 6 months. That didn't help.Now I have done physical therapy for the last 5 months. That didn't seem to help either. I had steroids injected 4 weeks ago, and it may be helping some, but there is still pain. And I had another arthro-MRI done and it came back inconclusive, with it unable to confirm or deny an additional tear in the cartilage.

Then I saw a different physical therapist 2 weeks ago who said my pelvis is rotated down and forward on the right side. I, too, have been previously told (as far back as the 7th grade) that I have a leg-length discrepency, but according to the PT that I just saw he said that it is only the appearance of a leg length discrepency due to the rotation of the pelvis. So now I plan to do a couse of physical therapy with this fellow to see if it will solve the problem. I was also given the "squeeze the ball between the knees" exercise as well as a belt to wear around my hips to keep them in place. I think it will take multiple visits to the PT, though, to overcome this since I think my hips have probably been rotated this way for at least 12 years. I'm really crossing my fingers that it does the trick since the last option is exploratory hip surgery, and that really doesn't sound appealing:(

So, I just wanted to write and say I feel your pain and frustrations. I was a college basketball player who had just taken up running and triathlons when this occured and I was immensely frustrated by it. But now I've come to terms with it a bit more and appreciate how my swimming as improved since it's the only exercise I've really been able to do for the last 2 years! And I try to tell myself that the short term fulfillment of competing in a few races now is not worth sacrificing many years of hiking, biking, running and walking when I get older. It sure has been a lesson in patience, though, which I am not particularly prone to!

okay, so that wasn't really a short story, but it's about all i have to contribute to trifuel right now since I don't have anything to say about training or races or any of the fun stuff. I wish you the best of luck figuring it out and hopefully we'll both be back on the race course soon enough.

tri-ac's picture
Joined: Dec 7 2005
Posts: 3717
jgJones, welcome to the

jgJones, welcome to the logged in side of trifuel...given your comments above, you should fit in just fine. knowing anything about any given topic doesn't stop any of the rest of us from piping in ;) nice comments...glad you decided to speak up!

Roy
Roy's picture
Joined: May 24 2008
Posts: 4
Hi Guys - I am not a

Hi Guys - I am not a tri-athelete but have suffered from exactly the same afflictions for 30 YEARS. It has gone undiagnosed or misdiagnosed by doctors, physios and orthopaedic surgeons all this time. I am in NZ and I think they haven't struck it so much here and certainly dont seem to treat anyone for it.

When I read your messages they rang absolutely true for me. I have been "clamping" my hips as management for a few years now - sound familiar?

I will now move down this pelvic misalignment treatment path.

What has given you the best results?

Roy
Roy's picture
Joined: May 24 2008
Posts: 4
Hi Guys - I am not a

Hi Guys - I am not a tri-athelete but have suffered from exactly the same afflictions for 30 YEARS. It has gone undiagnosed or misdiagnosed by doctors, physios and orthopaedic surgeons all this time. I am in NZ and I think they haven't struck it so much here and certainly dont seem to treat anyone for it.

When I read your messages they rang absolutely true for me. I have been "clamping" my hips as management for a few years now - sound familiar?

I will now move down this pelvic misalignment treatment path.

What has given you the best results?

Roy
Roy's picture
Joined: May 24 2008
Posts: 4
Hi Guys - I am not a

Hi Guys - I am not a tri-athelete but have suffered from exactly the same afflictions for 30 YEARS. It has gone undiagnosed or misdiagnosed by doctors, physios and orthopaedic surgeons all this time. I am in NZ and I think they haven't struck it so much here and certainly dont seem to treat anyone for it.

When I read your messages they rang absolutely true for me. I have been "clamping" my hips as management for a few years now - sound familiar?

I will now move down this pelvic misalignment treatment path.

What has given you the best results?

One and Two's picture
Joined: Jun 28 2008
Posts: 1
Misalignment Pain is

Misalignment Pain is serious! A realignment of the hip and sacrial area is a good start. Application of pressure and trigger point is done on musculature areas that are stressed. Electrotherapy can be given. Assigned micro exercises at home, encluding posturing practice........laying down, getting up...setting, standing. How you align your body has to be relearned. Sleeping with a pillow between the knees to keep the hips in a natural position is a must (less stress). With concentrated efforts on the patients part, adding more exercises, and a caring Physical Therapist.......Progress can return life to a dislocated body! Advice...Look into a Physical therapist that specializes in Pelvic Floor Dysfunction....one that works with alignment issues of the pelvic region.

olivestri's picture
Joined: Jan 14 2008
Posts: 257
find a good chiropractor -

find a good chiropractor - perhaps one that works with athletes - and one who is not afaid to adjust extremeties, arms, legs, hips.

Raygir's picture
Joined: Feb 22 2008
Posts: 54
+1 on the GOOD Chiro, make

+1 on the GOOD Chiro, make sure the Doc works with or is a runner/ triathlete,, worked wonders for my leg length issues,, my old chiro treated the symptoms and not the cause, now I run with 8mm insert in my right shoe and orthotics and have had no pain ( mine was knee pain) after working with a Chiro that actually owns a running store and does Ultramarathons,, taking the wife there tonight as she has chronic lower back pain after running,

Roy
Roy's picture
Joined: May 24 2008
Posts: 4
Hi All. Thanks for the info.

Hi All.

Thanks for the info. Since I last posted I have been trialling my own variation of "pelvic re-alignment excercises" and they have been VERY SUCCESSFUL. To the point of being much more successful THAN ANYTHING I HAVE TRIED FOR 26 YEARS.

THANKS HEAPS.

I have not needed to go to any practitioners etc. and the results (although not perfect) have restored me to sanity and a functionality of 9 out of 10.

I am now totally convinced that my troubles stem from pelvic misalignment and pelvic floor weakness and I can now handle things much better and with minimal pain and discomfort.

THANKS AGAIN

thomashealer's picture
Joined: Aug 8 2008
Posts: 2
Like most people I also had

Like most people I also had a leg length discrepancy and did not realize that this is an important thing to take care of because it is a sign of a twisted and mislaigned pelvis. Since then I learned a lot and now I am able to take care of myself and to correct any misalignment with a little self discipline and a few self therapy exercises.
I use a Method called the Dorn Method and it took about two month of daily exercises (self therapy) for a few minutes to make the change. Although I felt and saw the result very fast (after a few days) I made the mistake to stop the exercises too early because I did not have any problems anymore. Now I understand that my body needs more time to gradually adjust to new situations and even I am not motivated by pain to do something I promised myself to make this self therapy a daily and happy routine. Now different long legs and my back pains are a thing from the past.

MononokesFlute's picture
Joined: Oct 4 2008
Posts: 1
hello, I had a recent

hello, I had a recent adjustment that aggrevated my pelvic alignment such tha the pelvis is now forward and down on the right side. I have sharp knee pain and planters faciitis on the right since the alignment and the right hip is often sore. I was wondering if anyone could provide more details on the hip alignment exercises (belt around the knee?? squeezing a ball between the knees?), and also whether the pelvic needs correct alignment by a professional BEFORE beginning these exercises. Also, how would one wear a belt around the hip to stabilize the pelvis? Any kind of belt? Thanks! I'm hoping to regain my strength and soundness on the right side such that I can resume plans for long-distance hiking.

hammerin hop's picture
Joined: Jul 18 2008
Posts: 14
It's been a long time since

It's been a long time since I've posted on here (did my first tri this past weekend!) But I wanted to comment on pelvic alignment. Last summer I developed a sports hernia and microtears in several muscles in my groin, lower abs, and pelvic floor. While it wasn't directly a result of unaligned hips, the doctor mentioned this could have been a cause. I completed 16 weeks of PT, and STILL do PT exercises as often as I can, and it seems to have gotten better. The most important things that I have realized as a result is balanced core strength is a must. Yoga works wonders for this, and may laso help with alignment.

Not sure there was any substance to my response, but know you're not alone!

horsebackrider's picture
Joined: Dec 20 2009
Posts: 2
Mid September 2009 I injured

Mid September 2009 I injured myself carrying something too heavy on my right shoulder. I was almost better right before Thanksgiving until my Physical Therapist (PT) gave me a belt to wear to keep my pelvis in place. Now this has set me back with new symptoms. In the beginning I could not even bend. But that went away. This time I cannot lift myself from a squatting position without pulling myself up with something like a sofa or coffee table, etc.

I go to see a physiatrists (Sports/injury specialist) on 12/30/09, but am concerned that my pelvis will never stay in alignment. I started doing exercises from my PT on a daily basis. Now I can hardly perform any of them. The muscles around my pelvis are super tight. There are bands that go from my pelvis down to my leg, buttocks and low back.

I had trouble sitting from the beginning, but not standing. Now I cannot stand for long periods: only 10 minutes to 1 hour (on a good day).

The PT taught my husband how to align my pelvis. I only wish he was not out of town so often. I only get to see the PT twice a week.

I definitely wanted to warn others about the belt. The PT told me I shouldn't be wearing it when I am in pain, as this means that I am out of alignment.

Any help suggestions would be appreciated.

trekrider's picture
Joined: Sep 26 2009
Posts: 180
the routine where u lie on

the routine where u lie on ur back and use a belt is often used to aligned the SI joint. Keep going to a PT and doing the exercises. Chiro wont help here. good luck

horsebackrider's picture
Joined: Dec 20 2009
Posts: 2
trekrider, Thanks for the

trekrider,

Thanks for the encouragement. My PT had me wear the belt while walking around and doing my normal routine. When I would sit I would just keep the elastic part on and when I stood I would have the really tight clip part on. Is the belt supposed be only used for lying down, and if so what can I read that is in writing about that?

Why do you say that a chiro won't help with this? I have been to chirpractors a lot over the last 15 years and my PT isn't doing anything different than the chiro would do: tens unit, massage, exercises, adjustment.

Thanks again!

trekrider's picture
Joined: Sep 26 2009
Posts: 180
i guess it depends on the

i guess it depends on the chiro. but my view is that with pelvic misalignment, you have to do continuous exercises that will stabilize the pelvis. such as engaging your low abs for support of the pelvis. Im guessing he is having you wear the belt while standing to promote hip abduction, so that you must slight push out. Do your knees tend to "bo in"?

bengreenfield's picture
Joined: Jul 24 2008
Posts: 117
It's a pretty common problem

It's a pretty common problem and we see it all the time at our medical clinic. I actually penned a manual to fix it. http://www.runwithnopain.com

Best of luck,
Ben

Warrior's picture
Joined: Dec 5 2007
Posts: 1566
+1 to the Strong core, I

+1 to the Strong core, I have been debilitated to the point where I couldn't walk. I was in agony, from the moment I got out of bed to the moment I got back in. I followed a lot of different therapies. What finally worked for me is due to Garen's core challenge. I looked up a few excercises and found some to strengthen the lower back. I wouldn't have found them if it were not for the challenge. I can move around run cycle and swim now, but I still have pain. However it's manageable. I stretch and look after my core. It's an absolute must. Personally I would stay away from shoe implants, I think they make the problem worse. I don't believe in short leg syndrome. I believe the tension in the muscles misaligns the hip pulling one leg up slightly.
Get popped in by the Chiropractor and then stretch those muscles and work that core.

laurabot's picture
Joined: Sep 14 2010
Posts: 1
I've also had this condition

I've also had this condition for nearly 10 years, I've managed to get it to a manageble stage. Seeing a sports therapist for physical adjustments and also muscle work has helped a lot but there are quite a few ways to re-align the pelvis yourself which saves discomfort and also repeated cost of visits to a professional.

I've set up a page where I list what has helped me #1 has really changed my life as it is so simple to do and aligns the pelvis 99% of the time. I hope it can help someone else:

http://www.hflblog.com/?page_id=40

Laura

Ron Yamamoto's picture
Joined: Jul 6 2012
Posts: 2
The misalignment of the

The misalignment of the pelvis is a common problem with all of us: you can find if your pelvis were misaligned by looking at yourself in a mirror while standing straight naturally with the both legs closed together. Should the shoulder tilted (or misaligned) with the “right side” higher than the left side, your pelvis (or the pelvic cage) is misaligned (or tilted) with the “right hip bone” lower than the left one.

How does this happen? The mechanism of the misalignment of the shoulder starts with the misalignment (or tilt) of the pelvis. With the misaligned (or tilted) pelvis, the spinal column twists itself spontaneously in attempt to compensate for the postural misalignment which in turn makes the shoulder tilt or misalign. Such physical behavior causes constant pressure and strain on the network of nerves running through the spine, which in turn causes to lower back pain or a host of other physiological problems.

Importantly, few realize the stress on the spinal nerves can be a contributing or a primary cause of almost any ailment one may suffer in his or her life. In conclusion, the pelvic alignment affects directly to the postural alignment leading to bring the spinal column into line. The spinal alignment helps lessen the stress on the spinal nerves’ system, thereby helps prevent from or relieves the lower back, shoulder pain or, not limited to, almost any internal ailment.

Now, how can we correct the misaligned pelvis that may have been a cause giving us, either transitional or chronic, physical discomforts or ailments?
(1) The first answer is that we almost always and first to look at getting the chiropractic treatment as we run into the situation with suffering from back ache, stiff shoulder or leg numbness, cramp or more.
(a) Is this the real solution? No, the chiropractic or massage treatment would give you a sensation with relieving your physical discomfort, which unfortunately would last just a short period of time varying from a few hours to a few days.
(b) Why is it so? The reason is that the physical structures or the muscles holding the bone structures of the human body tend or behave towards going back to their natural or most comfortable positions, which is called “habits.”
(c) Such habits in general are fostered in our life styles since our childhood resulting from how you sit in the office or while you are driving the car, or how you sleep.
(d) Your chiropractor is well aware of such physical behavior that the efficacy of his treatment would last in a finite time so that he provides you with a belt to help your pelvis or spine stay in the corrected state with the treatment.
(e) Such belts, in most cases, do not last too long owing to their fabric material that in general tends to fold up (in a relatively short period of time) in a shape of a bold band. Thus, the belts become ineffective and unable to hold the chiropractic treatments’ efficacy once the belt reaches this condition.
(f) Equally important fact is those supporting belts provided by chiropractors,
in general, are wearable for a few hours at a time because of the constriction of the blood circulation due to the belt material made with the elastic such as “Rubber.” Wearing the belts for short period of time at a time with a taking on and off manner would make the efficacy out of the chiropractic treatments diminish quickly.
(g) It is unspoken while generally well known, even some chiropractors admit in my past experience, that such chiropractic practice with providing an inexpensive and short lasting belts is a main stream in the chiropractic practice how to make the patients keep coming back to the treatments. The more the patients rely on the belts, the more often the patients visit the chiropractic clinics.
(2) Is any other alternative medicine available?
Yes, I run into a unique product, a pelvic alignment and support belt, eight years ago after trying with many similar belts over the years. I had been long suffering from the lower back ache since the college years and, for years after my fifties, leg cramp while sleeping and the difficulties with pain when walking, sitting or even stepping into pants and bath tab. Today, I am 73 years old and have overcome those physical difficulties with a pelvic alignment and support belt with a long hour wearable quality (7/24 even weeks continuously) without the elastic like “Rubber” and its designated exercise regimen.
I’ve learned the alignment of the pelvis is the pivot for maintaining our total health.
While realizing the efficacy of wearing the belt varies from an individual to others, I recommend you to visit the website (www,koshiluck.com) for more information: It may work on you!
The belt is a relatively expensive one, not like those you can find at a drug store at the corner, but I feel it worthy to spend $265.00 for the efficacy with wearable quality for at least 12 month period of time instead of paying $47.00 at each visit with a chiropractor for an indefinite period of time.

Ron Yamamoto's picture
Joined: Jul 6 2012
Posts: 2
Ron Yamamoto wrote:The

[quote=Ron Yamamoto]The misalignment of the pelvis is a common problem with all of us: you can find if your pelvis were misaligned by looking at yourself in a mirror while standing straight naturally with the both legs closed together. Should the shoulder tilted (or misaligned) with the “right side” higher than the left side, your pelvis (or the pelvic cage) is misaligned (or tilted) with the “right hip bone” lower than the left one.

How does this happen? The mechanism of the misalignment of the shoulder starts with the misalignment (or tilt) of the pelvis. With the misaligned (or tilted) pelvis, the spinal column twists itself spontaneously in attempt to compensate for the postural misalignment which in turn makes the shoulder tilt or misalign. Such physical behavior causes constant pressure and strain on the network of nerves running through the spine, which in turn causes to lower back pain or a host of other physiological problems.

Importantly, few realize the stress on the spinal nerves can be a contributing or a primary cause of almost any ailment one may suffer in his or her life. In conclusion, the pelvic alignment affects directly to the postural alignment leading to bring the spinal column into line. The spinal alignment helps lessen the stress on the spinal nerves’ system, thereby helps prevent from or relieves the lower back, shoulder pain or, not limited to, almost any internal ailment.

Now, how can we correct the misaligned pelvis that may have been a cause giving us, either transitional or chronic, physical discomforts or ailments?
(1) The first answer is that we almost always and first to look at getting the chiropractic treatment as we run into the situation with suffering from back ache, stiff shoulder or leg numbness, cramp or more.
(a) Is this the real solution? No, the chiropractic or massage treatment would give you a sensation with relieving your physical discomfort, which unfortunately would last just a short period of time varying from a few hours to a few days.
(b) Why is it so? The reason is that the physical structures or the muscles holding the bone structures of the human body tend or behave towards going back to their natural or most comfortable positions, which is called “habits.”
(c) Such habits in general are fostered in our life styles since our childhood resulting from how you sit in the office or while you are driving the car, or how you sleep.
(d) Your chiropractor is well aware of such physical behavior that the efficacy of his treatment would last in a finite time so that he provides you with a belt to help your pelvis or spine stay in the corrected state with the treatment.
(e) Such belts, in most cases, do not last too long owing to their fabric material that in general tends to fold up (in a relatively short period of time) in a shape of a bold band. Thus, the belts become ineffective and unable to hold the chiropractic treatments’ efficacy once the belt reaches this condition.
(f) Equally important fact is those supporting belts provided by chiropractors,
in general, are wearable for a few hours at a time because of the constriction of the blood circulation due to the belt material made with the elastic such as “Rubber.” Wearing the belts for short period of time at a time with a taking on and off manner would make the efficacy out of the chiropractic treatments diminish quickly.
(g) It is unspoken while generally well known, even some chiropractors admit in my past experience, that such chiropractic practice with providing an inexpensive and short lasting belts is a main stream in the chiropractic practice how to make the patients keep coming back to the treatments. The more the patients rely on the belts, the more often the patients visit the chiropractic clinics.
(2) Is any other alternative medicine available?
Yes, I run into a unique product, a pelvic alignment and support belt, eight years ago after trying with many similar belts over the years. I had been long suffering from the lower back ache since the college years and, for years after my fifties, leg cramp while sleeping and the difficulties with pain when walking, sitting or even stepping into pants and bath tab. Today, I am 73 years old and have overcome those physical difficulties with a pelvic alignment and support belt with a long hour wearable quality (7/24 even weeks continuously) without the elastic like “Rubber” and its designated exercise regimen.
I’ve learned the alignment of the pelvis is the pivot for maintaining our total health.
While realizing the efficacy of wearing the belt varies from an individual to others, I recommend you to visit the website (www.koshiluck.com) for more information: It may work on you!
The belt is a relatively expensive one, not like those you can find at a drug store at the corner, but I feel it worthy to spend $265.00 for the efficacy with wearable quality for at least 12 month period of time instead of paying $47.00 at each visit with a chiropractor for an indefinite period of time.
[/quote]

podriscoll's picture
Joined: Oct 17 2012
Posts: 1
Hi there I was searching on

Hi there
I was searching on the net for dignosins of a problem I have had since 2007 when I developed an injury running a marathon an foolishly continued and completed it in aganoy. I was amazed to read JGJones post of over 4 years ago its a mirror image of my own injury and I to had MRI's and they discovered a torn superior labrum so I had keyhole surgery thinking this was the answer to all my problems but was very dissapointed when the hip pains continued and over time it transferd to the other hip also. Basically I cannot sit for long periods of time without nerve type pains running though my posterior muscles my job is office based and sitting all day kills me, once I stand the pain disappears I can even run most days but 40-45 min max (17 marathons completed I know there will be no more for me). I just want a better quality of life right now.
As you can imagine I have seen lots of Physio's, Austio's, Chiro's, consultants and quacks. Its cost a fortune and I totally dejedted.
I'm now thiking Pelvic Misalignment is my problem. I'd really like to hear form JGJones and how he is doing now as I feel our injury is identical of if anyone else has advice I'd love to hear.

Regards

Pat

ebk
ebk's picture
Joined: Jul 28 2013
Posts: 1
I have dealt with the same

I have dealt with the same issue for years and this is the first thing that I have read or heard that really hit home with me. Here is my story.

I had hip pain and just worked though it for about 18years. Once it got to the point that I couldn't run more than 2 miles without feeling like my right leg could not possibly take another step forward I finally went to the doc (August 2012). I have small tear in my labrum. At least that what the doc thinks it is since it didn't show up in the MRI. He recommended that I try PT before surgery. He sent me to a lady who specializes in spinal and pelvic misalignments. I guess my lower back muscles were too strong and my abs were too weak so it was tilting my pelvis forward. After only one month of PT I was able to build milage quickly and do a half marathon in October! I had to concentrate on ever run to tension my abs and relax my lower back. It changed my stride and I was slower at first but I was amazed and felt great! I stopped PT and kept running half marathon distances until April when I had foot surgery for Morton's neuroma. That surgery went great and worked but now the hip issue is back. Apparently I need to continue PT and moving. As soon I sit it gets worse.

I guess I just wanted to write and highly recommend finding a physical therapist that specializes in pelvic misalignments. It worked great for me!

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